Saturday, 16-June-2007
Almotamar Net - SANAA (Reuters, agencies) - Yemeni rebels said on Saturday they had accepted a ceasefire proposed by the government to end months of violent clashes that have killed hundreds in the north of the Arab country. Agencies - SANAA (Reuters, agencies) - Yemeni rebels said on Saturday they had accepted a ceasefire proposed by the government to end months of violent clashes that have killed hundreds in the north of the Arab country.
"In response to the call ... and to prevent bloodshed, we declare a stop to violence and fighting and our commitment to the republican system and the constitution," said rebel leader Abdul-Malik al-Houthi in a statement sent to journalists.
Yemen's state news agency said on Thursday government forces would stop military operations against the rebels if they laid down their arms.
The rebels oppose Yemen's close alliance with the United States. Officials say the group wants to install clerical rule.
Hundreds of people have been killed and thousands have fled their homes in the latest bout of a conflict that has raged on and off since 2004.
In 2006, the government freed more than 600 of Houthi's followers in an amnesty but in January fighting erupted again following rebel attacks on the army.
The rebels say their mountainous region, like many parts of Yemen, has been neglected. Western diplomats say they may want more autonomy.
Yemen joined the U.S.-led war on terrorism after the September 11 2001 attacks in the United States.
Houthi's supporters are not linked to al Qaeda, whose Yemeni supporters attacked the U.S. destroyer Cole in 2000 and a French oil tanker in 2001 off the coast of Yemen.


Rebels in Yemen say they accept a ceasefire proposed by the government to end months of violent clashes that have killed scores of people.
"In response to the call... and to prevent bloodshed, we declare a stop to violence and fighting," said rebel leader Abdul-Malik al-Houthi.
The rebels respected "the republican system and the constitution", he said in a statement sent to journalists.
Fighting flared in January after rebel attacks on the army. In February, at least 80 rebels were killed in clashes with government forces.
Yemen's government says the rebels are followers of Houthi's brother, cleric Hussein al-Houthi, who was killed in 2004.
In 2006, the government released more than 600 Houthi followers in an amnesty deal.
Yemen has endured a sporadic three-year insurgency that has claimed hundreds of lives.
The rebels come from the heartland between the capital, Sana'a, and the border with Saudi Arabia.


Yemeni rebels said on Saturday they had accepted a ceasefire proposed by the government to end months of violent clashes that have killed hundreds in the north of the Arab country.
"In response to the call ... and to prevent bloodshed, we declare a stop to violence and fighting and our commitment to the republican system and the constitution," said rebel leader Abdul-Malik al-Houthi in a statement sent to journalists.
Yemen's state news agency said on Thursday government forces would stop military operations against the rebels if they laid down their arms.
The rebels oppose Yemen's close alliance with the United States. Officials say the group wants to install a clerical regime.
Rebels in northern Yemen said Saturday they had accepted a government-proposed ceasefire, ending months of fierce fighting in which thousands of people have been killed.
"In response to the call of the president (Ali Abdullah Saleh) ... we confirm our acceptance to cease violence in order to stop bloodshed," rebel leader Abdulmalik al-Huthi said in a statement released by the defence ministry.
This story was printed at: Monday, 20-August-2018 Time: 05:36 PM
Original story link: http://www.almotamar.net/en/2828.htm